Instructor Manual: Exploring Your Personality and Major


Handouts

 

Click the above link to view Word documents for all the handouts for this chapter.

 

Videos 

 


Assess Personality Type
 

The Do What You Are personality assessment is an integrated component of the online edition.  For the print edition, it is recommended that students use the access code located in the inside front cover of the printed text to complete the Do What You Are personality inventory before beginning the personality chapter.  Note that the directions for accessing this assessment are printed on the inside front cover of the text.  It is recommended that you review these directions before students begin the assessment.  The Do What You Are assessments provide results similar to the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI). 

 

The checklist of personality traits in the printed text helps students to analyze and better understand the assessment results.  Click here to view the the Personality Checklist.   

 

Obtaining the Best Results

 

To obtain valid results from the assessment, it is important that students understand the purpose and expectations of the assessment.  Setting the tone for administration of the Do What You Are is important to get the best results.  Before the assessment, remind the students of the following:

 

  1. To obtain the best results, keep in mind that there are no right or wrong answers and no better or worse personality types.  The test measures equally valuable personality preferences.
  2. This test does not measure intelligence or psychological health. 
  3. The purpose of the test is to identify your talents and gifts so that you can use this information to help you choose the best major or career.
  4. When answering the questions, keep in mind how you operate most naturally, smoothly and effortlessly.  Answer the questions according to what you are and not what you think you should be.   Do not answer the questions:

·         How you think you should be

·         How you have to be at work, school or in the home

·         How someone else expects you to be

·         How you act when you are stressed

  1. Honesty is important in getting useful results.
  2. Do not think too long about each answer.  Your first answer is likely to be true about you.

 

Click here to view a sample Do What You Are Assignment handout. 

 

Understanding Preference

 

Begin the interpretation by helping students understand the concept of preference.  According to Carl Jung’s theory, preference is inborn.  It is our preferred way to interact with the world.  Use this brief exercise to demonstrate how preference works:

 

Ask students to sign their name on a sheet of paper.  Ask how it felt.  Most say it is easy and comfortable.  Next challenge students to sign their name with their non-dominant hand.  Ask how this felt.  Most can do it, but it is awkward and a little challenging.  It requires a little extra thought to do it. 

 

Ask students, “With which hand do you reach for the pen?”  This is an example of inborn preference.  If students are aware of their preferences and choose their careers with these preferences in mind, they are more likely to be good at their jobs and enjoy them more.  If students choose careers that do not match their preferences, they can do the job, but are more likely to experience stress at work. 

 

The Job Jar Activity (Introducing DWYA)

Use this exercise to help students get ready for the DWYA and as an introduction to career planning.  Select random job titles and write them on a sheet of paper.  Have at least one job title for each of your students.  Place these papers in a large jar (or envelope).  Have students reach in the jar and select a job title.  Here are some questions for discussion:

  • Does this career match your personality?  Interests?  Values?  Learning Style?  Aptitudes?

  • How do people select a career?  Many select them randomly according to what is available or what they have seen in their environment.  

  • Is there a better way to explore your career than to select it out of a jar?  Career assessment such as the DWYA can help.  Take it seriously for the best results. 

See the Job Jar Directions handout for a more complete list of instructions and possibilities for this exercise and the Job Jar Careers for a list of 45 careers which can be cut out for this activity.   

 

Understanding Personality Type

 

Once students have completed Do What You Are, it is important to help students to understand their results and to understand other personality types.  Here are suggested steps:

 

It is suggested that you have students do a self-assessment before you discuss their results.  This increases the students’ understanding of the theory and gets them to think about their type. This can be done by using the checklist in the printed text or the Personality Checklist handout for the online text.  Introduce the topic using the Personality Introduction worksheet.  As you describe each dimension of personality, have students write a brief definition of each type and plot an X on the line to indicate their preferences.   

 

  1. Have students compare their self-assessment with the results from DWYA.  Some students will find that their self-assessment differs from their DWYA results.  The reported results are based on how students answer the questions in the assessment.  Discuss these questions:

 

·         Did you answer the questions about how you usually are or how you want to be?  Remember that each type has his or her own unique gifts and talents.

·         Did you answer the questions based on how you act at home, work or at school?  Different environments may require that we act in a different way than what we prefer.

·         Are you in a stressful period in your life and going through many changes?  This may cause us to question our preferences. 

·         Are there some preferences commonly viewed by society as more desirable?  For example, there are more extraverts than introverts in society.  As a result, it is often seen as less desirable to be an introvert.  What are the strengths of each type?  Can you think of examples of careers where being an extravert or an introvert would be an advantage?

 

The DWYA provides the opportunity to for students to do some self-assessment.  When students do not indicate a clear preference for one type or another, they are given two personality descriptions and asked to choose which one is most like them.  For this reason, the type on the profile and the bar graph may not match.  The bar graph on the profile indicates the results of the students’ choices on the assessment.  The personality type is what the student has chosen after the assessment is completed. 

 

Reassure students that they can decide on their type.  Any assessment, even though it is valid and reliable, is just a tool to help students think about their type.  Classroom exercises may help students to clarify their thinking about their type. 

 

  1. Classroom exercises can help students to clarify their type.  There are a variety of exercises included in this chapter.  Choose the exercises that you find interesting and that appeal to the students you are teaching.  To get a deeper understanding of each dimension of personality, do one exercise and one five minute free write on each dimension of personality.  For the free write, pose a question and have students write about it for five minutes.  Then have them underline the most important point.  Ask for volunteers to share the most important point in their free writing assignment.  An example of a free writing question is, “Are you an introvert, extravert or a combination type?” 

  

Introvert/Extravert

Review the concept.  Have students review the introvert and extravert scale on Do What You Are and the personality checklist.      

Exercise:  Introvert and Extravert: Talkers and Listeners (See directions below.)

Free Write (5 minutes) on one of these topics:

·         I am an introvert.

·         I am an extravert.

·         I am a combination introvert/extravert

 

Sensing/Intuitive

Review the concept.  Have students review the Do What You Are scale for sensing and intuition and the personality checklist.    

Exercise: Sensing and Intuition: The Apple Exercise or Show a Picture Exercise (See directions below.)

Free Write (5 minutes) on one of these topics:

·         I am a sensing type.

·         I am an intuitive type.

·         I am a combination sensing/intuitive type.

 

Thinking/Feeling

Review the concept.  Have students review the Do What You Are scale for thinking and feeling and the personality checklist.     

Exercise: Personality: Thinking or Feeling? (See directions below.)

Free write (5 minutes) on one of these topics:

·         I am a thinking type.

·         I am a feeling type.

·         I am a combination thinking/feeling type.

 

Judging/Perceptive

Review the concept.  Emphasize to students that judging means orderly and organized and that perceptive means spontaneous.  Students often misinterpret these words.  Have students review the Do What You Are scale for judging and intuition and personality checklist.      

 

Exercise: Group Activity: Judging Vs. Perceptive or Where Do You Stand? (See directions for two exercises below.)

Free write (5 minutes) on one of these topics:

·         I am a judging type.

·         I am a perceptive type.

·         I am a combination judging/perceptive type

 

Introvert and Extravert: Talkers and Listeners

 

Both talking and listening skills are important for good communication.  Ask students to identify themselves as talkers or listeners.  Have talkers move to one side of the room and listeners move to the other side of the room.  Break up these large groups into smaller groups of 4-5 students.  Designate a reporter for each group.  Each group answers the following questions:

 

                        For the talkers:

·         What made me a talker?

·         How can I develop my listening skills?

·         How can I help listeners talk more?

 

For the listeners:

·         What made me a listener?

·         How can I develop my talking skills?

·         How can I help talkers listen more?

 

Ask the two groups to face each other and report on the group discussion.  As the instructor, emphasize the importance of all students participating in classroom discussions.  For additional discussion, ask these questions:

How can the awareness gained from today’s discussion improve communication in your personal life?   How can it improve communication on the job?  How can it improve communication in this class?

 

Click here to view the handout on Talkers and Listeners

 

Introvert and Extravert: Effective Work Environment

 

Separate introverts and extraverts into two groups and have them go to opposite sides of the room.  Have each group brainstorm this question, “What work environment allows you to be most effective?”  Have a reporter from each group present the ideas to the class. 

 

Generally the introvert likes a quiet environment and their own space.  Extroverts like more interactions with others and move activities.  Introverts often mention that they want windows to provide opportunities for contemplation.  Extraverts want windows to see what is going on outside. 

 

Sensing and Intuition: The Apple Exercise

 

Bring an apple to class as a prop.  Show the apple to the class and ask students to write about it for 2 minutes.  Generally the sensing types will write a description based on their senses (what they can see, hear, taste, and touch).   Read the sensing student examples below and then ask sensing students in the class to read what they have written.   They will often give facts about the apple.   

 

Then read the samples below from intuitive students.  Then ask intuitive types to read what they have written.  These types often go beyond the facts to describe associations connected with apples.  They rarely just describe the physical characteristics of the apple.  Use the student comments to further describe the intuitive type.    

 

Be careful when giving directions to this exercise.  Do not ask students to describe the apple or all students will focus on description rather than using their intuition.  Also remember that some students are combination types so they may describe the apple in both a sensing and intuitive way.  It is helpful to give examples of sensing type answers and ask if any sensing types wrote similar answers.  Do the same for intuitive answers.  You can use any other object for this exercise.  Any fruit is good for this exercise since you can describe it using all the senses or add creative insights. 

 

Here are examples of what sensing students in my class wrote about the apple:

The apple is colored red and yellow.  It has a small stem and doesn't look like it is completely ripe.  It has a sticker on it and it is relatively small. 

 

The apple is yellow, red, round, tasty, and healthy.  It smells fresh and tastes good. 

 

The apple is red and yellow, almost gold.  One side is red and slowly mixes into the yellow.  The stem is curved at a 90-degree angle.  One side is larger than the other. 

 

Here are examples of what intuitive students in my class wrote about the apple:

This apple has made a long journey.  Its life began as a seed thrown into a desolate field by a young boy who was enjoying the apple on a summer night.  The boy was the son of a farmer who owned an apple orchard. 

 

The round apple flew across the room as it left my hand.  All you could see was a red and yellow blur as it went by.  Then "Pop," the apple hit Stephen right in the head.   

 

There’s an apple sitting there

Without a care

No legs or feet

It’s red and round

It has no face to smile or frown 

 

Personality: Thinking or Feeling?

 

After students have assessed their personality types and understand the results, conduct an interview with a thinking type and a feeling type. Ask for a volunteer who is an extravert with a strong preference for thinking.  Choose a male volunteer since men often have a higher preference for thinking.  Ask for another volunteer who is an extravert with a strong preference for feeling.  Choose a female volunteer since women have a higher preference for feeling.  Write these interview questions on a sheet of paper and give them to the volunteers.   

 

1.    Describe ___________college.  (Insert your college name here.)

2.    Tell about a good movie you have seen lately.

3.    If you were on the popular TV show “Elimidate” who would you choose to keep and who would you eliminate?

 

Ask one of the volunteers to leave the room so that they do not hear the responses to the interview.  Ask your first volunteer the above questions.  Ask the class to listen to the responses and to find out how thinking and feeling types are different.  When the first volunteer has finished, call in the second volunteer and ask the questions again. 

 

Feeling types generally describe how they feel about the college and describe movies that involve feelings such as romances.  They usually eliminate the date based on feelings.  The thinking types often describe a map of the campus.  They generally like action movies with complex plots.  They analyze dates on criteria such as physical appearance, compatibility and matching personal characteristics.   

 

When the interviews are complete, repeat each question and ask the class to discuss the differences between the thinking and feeling types.

 

Another variation of this exercise is to give all students the questions to answer.  Then have them underline phrases that show they are thinking or feeling types.  Click here to view the handout, Thinking or Feeling?  

For a group activity to illustrate the differences between T and F, divide your students into small groups of T's and F's.  Tell them that they are coaches for a little league team.  The team is going out of town for an important game, but you only have enough money to pay for 15 out of the 21 players.  How do you decide who goes?  Here are some discussion questions:

How did you make the decision? 
How difficult was it to make the decision and why?  (It will be more difficult for feeling types to make the decision.)
Thinking types make decisions based on logic.  Feeling types makes decisions based on their personal values.  Did you see evidence of this decision-making style in this exercise?

 

Group Activity: Judging Vs. Perceptive

 

There is potential for conflict between people who are Judging and Perceptive because of their very different way of looking at the world.  After students know their personality types, divide the class into Judgers and Perceivers.  Ask the Judging types to go to one side of the room and the Perceptive types to go to the other side.  Sometimes you may have a group of combination types that are in the middle between Judging and Perceptive.  It is interesting to have these students in a separate group.  Break these large groups into smaller groups of 4-5 students of the same type.  Instruct the groups to review the definitions in the book before beginning the discussion.  Ask the groups to come up with 5 benefits of being a Judger (for the Judging groups) or a Perceiver (for the Perceptive groups).  If you have a combination group, ask this group to come up with 5 benefits of being a combination type.  Walk around the room as ask each group to select a reporter to report the results.  Remind the groups that it is equally good to be a Judger or Perceiver.  The point of this exercise is not to get in a debate, but to understand the gifts and talents of each type.

 

Have the reporters from the Perceptive group report first because these students are often the minority in a college setting.  It is commonly assumed that being flexible and spontaneous (perceptive) is not as good as being orderly and organized (judging).  

 

As a summary, be sure to emphasize the benefits of each type:

 

Perceivers:

  1. Are able to deal with emergencies and adapt to change.  This is important for survival in today’s rapidly changing world.
  2. Are able to relax and enjoy themselves.  They often come up with fun ideas. 
  3. Want to look at all the possibilities before they decide.  Something better may come along.

 

Judgers:

  1. Reach their goals.
  2. Organize their time and are naturally good at time management.
  3. Relax once things are organized and under control.
  4. Can make decisions quickly.

 

Combination Types:

  1.  These types have the best of both worlds.  They can get things done when needed.
  2. They can put aside the work and have fun. 
  3. They can “go with the flow,” or organize themselves.

 

It is a good idea at the end to discuss the idea that we often need to adapt to meet the demands of college or work.  The Judgers may need to respect the Perceivers and value their talents.  The Perceivers may need to get more organized and meet deadlines.

 

Group Activity: Where do you stand?  Judging or Perceptive

This activity gets students out of their seats and thinking about their preferences.  On one side of the room, post a sign that says, “I can play anytime” and on the other side of the room, post a sign that says “I have to finish my work before I can play.”  Have students form a line from one side to the other depending on how much they agree with one of these statements.  Give students permission to stand in the middle if they think that they are combination types.  They can discuss this with other students as they are forming the line.  Stress that the purpose of this exercise is to increase understanding and appreciation of these opposite types.  One type is not better than the other.  Once the line is formed, ask these questions:

Why did you choose your position is the line? Why did you choose to stand in the middle?
How do you like to do your work?
How do you work with people at the opposite extremes?
How do you deal with stress?
How do you manage your time? (Perceptive types may need help with time management in school or work.)

Another variation of this exercise is to ask about how people go on vacation.  Use these two statements:

            I plan in advance.
            I just go. 

 

Follow up with similar questions as above:

Why did you choose your position in line?

What would you do if you suddenly had the opportunity to go to _____?

How would you get ready for your trip?

What would it be like to go on vacation with someone on the opposite side of the line? 

 As a summary, be sure to emphasize the benefits of each type:

Perceivers:

  1. Are able to deal with emergencies and adapt to change.  This is important for survival in today’s rapidly changing world.
  2. Are able to relax and enjoy themselves.  They often come up with fun ideas. 
  3. Want to look at all the possibilities before they decide.  Something better may come along.

  Judgers:

  1. Reach their goals.
  2. Organize their time and are naturally good at time management.
  3. Relax once things are organized and under control.
  4. Can make decisions quickly.

 Combination Types:

  1.  These types have the best of both worlds.  They can get things done when needed.
  2. They can put aside the work and have fun. 
  3. They can “go with the flow,” or organize themselves.

J and P Exercise: Design a House with M&M's

Divide students into groups of J's and groups of P's.  Set a time limit of 15 minutes, give each group a bag of M&M's and ask them to design a house.  The J's often go about this task in an orderly fashion by sorting the M&M's by color and building a square house.  The P's jump in and just make a house.  The houses are often round and have fun amenities such as a spa.  Have the groups discuss how the process they used for building their houses and how it relates to their personality types.   

Discussion Scenarios

 

The following are some scenarios for discussion.  Click here to view the handout for Personality Scenarios

 

Scenario 1 (Sensing vs. Intuitive):  Julie is a pre-school teacher.  She assigns her class to draw a picture of a bicycle.  Students share their pictures with the class.  One of the students has drawn a bicycle with wings.  Another student laughs at the drawing and says, "Bicycles don't have wings!"  How should the teacher handle this situation?

 

Scenario 2 (Thinking vs. Feeling):  John has the almost perfect girlfriend.  She is beautiful, intelligent and fun to be with.  She only has one flaw.  John thinks that she is too emotional and wishes she could be a little more rational.  When his girlfriend tries to talk to him about emotional issues, he analyzes her problems and proposes a logical solution.  His girlfriend doesn't like the solutions that John proposes.  Should John find a new girlfriend?

 

Scenario 3 (Introvert vs. Extravert):  Mary is the mother of 2 children ages 5 (daughter) and 8 (son).  The five-year old is very social and especially enjoys birthday parties.  At the last party she invited 24 girls and they all showed up at the party.  Everyone had a great time.  The 8 year old is very quiet and spends his time reading, doing art work, building models and hanging out with his one best friend.  Mary is concerned that her son does not have very many friends.  She decides to have a birthday party for her son also.  The only problem is that he cannot come up with a list of children to invite to the party.  What should Mary do?

 

Scenario 4 (Judging vs. Perceptive):  Jerry and Jennifer have just been married and they love each other very much.  Jennifer likes to keep the house neat and orderly and likes to plan out activities so that there are no surprises.  Jerry likes creative disorder.  He leaves his things all over the house.  He often comes up with creative ideas for having fun.  How can Jerry and Jennifer keep their good relationship going?

 

 What Are My Preferences?

 

This is an exercise that gets students out of their seats and moving around while thinking about their preferences as related to personality type.  The teacher explains that we all have different preferences and writes some opposites on the board.  Here are some examples contrasting preferences in the work environment.  (These are taken from the chapter on personality in the sections on work environment).

 

§  Quiet for concentration             vs.                   Social interaction

§  Work individually                       vs.                   Work as part of a team

§  Common sense                         vs.                   Imagination and innovation

§  Solve problems                          vs.                   Make a personal contribution

§  Use logic and analysis              vs.                   Help others

§  Stability and security                 vs.                   Be adventurous

§  High responsibility                     vs.                   Interesting work                   

 

 

Students are asked to “stand up for what they prefer.”  For example, those who value quiet for concentration (introverts) stand on one side of the room.  Those who prefer a high-energy environment (extroverts) stand on the other side of the classroom.  If you are short on space in the classroom, students can be asked to remain at their seats and stand up or take this exercise outside.   After the students have made a choice, discuss how these preferences relate to personality and preferences in the work place. 

 

This type of exercise can also be done with contrasting sets of values.  Students can be asked to stand up for what they value. 

 

Sharing Personality Profiles

 

Ask students to think about their personality code and to identify something that is particularly true about their type.  Read through the personality codes one by one.  (For example, ENFP, ISTJ, etc.)  Ask students to raise their hands when they hear their code.  Ask each student to share what is particularly true about their type.  Students enjoy sharing the information and discovering others in the class who have the same personality type.  The exercise takes about 20 minutes for 30 students.  

 

(Contributed by Carla Edwards, Instructor, Cuyamaca College, El Cajon, CA)

 

What Is My Personality Type?

 

Have students work in pairs.  Have one student read the following list of words and ask the other what is the first thing that comes to mind:

·         Wasting time

·         Fun

·         Hard work

·         Burnout

·         Time off

·         Duty

·         Accomplishment

 

Based on the responses, guess whether the other is a judging or a perceptive type.

 

(Contributed by Laurie Brown, Career Center Director, Cuyamaca College, El Cajon, CA)

 

Personality Profiles

 

Students always find it interesting to look at their personality profiles.  Additional profiles are available in the DWYA Handbook and on the Internet at http://www.personalitypage.com.  They are also available in the book by Paul and Barbara Tieger listed in the resources below.  Have students practice the skimming technique with these profiles.  Suggest that they highlight phrases that they agree with and that describe them well.  Ask students to look at these profiles and make a list of at least ten personality strengths.

 

Personality Skits

 

Assign students to write a brief skit or dialog between any of these types:

            Introvert/Extravert

            Sensing/Intuitive

            Thinking/Feeling

            Judging/Perceptive

 

Encourage students to use a sense of humor when writing these skits.  Perform the skit for the class.  Ask the class to identify the personality profile being portrayed. 

 

Here is an example of how one instructor used five minute skits effectively in the classroom. 

He first assigned students to write these skits:

  1. First Day of College (Introvert/Extrovert)

You are dropped off at the dorm on your first day of college.  You are an extrovert and your best friend is an introvert.  Write a dialog of no more than five minutes.

  1. The Cheating Boyfriend (Intuitive, Sensing)

Your best friend (intuitive) tells you that she has a gut feeling that your boyfriend is cheating on you.  You are a sensing type and want proof.

  1. The Therapy Session (Judging, Perceptive)

The instructor role plays being a therapist who is working with a couple who have marital problems.  The marital problems include differing ideas on housekeeping and whether vacations should be planned or just be done spontaneously. 

  1. The Blind Date (Introvert, Extrovert)

This is a dialog between an extrovert who wants to party and be with a large group of people and one is who is quieter and prefers time with one other person or a small group.

  1. Valentine's Day (Thinking, Feeling)

This is a discussion between a man (thinking type) and a woman (feeling type) about what is expected on Valentine's Day.  The man thinks that the woman should know that she is loved because he is there and provides income and a home for the family.  The woman expects the man to be more romantic and remember the Valentine traditions with candy and flowers. 

  1. The UFO

This is a discussion about UFO's, the Loch Ness Monster and Bigfoot between an intuitive and an unbelieving sensing type who wants proof of their existence. 

 

Students are given a description of the different personality types or could use section in the text on personality types to serve as a reference.  Students are divided into groups of 4.  The skit is presented and then the group has two minutes to discuss what personality type is being exhibited before going on to the next skit.  Discuss the results at the end of all the skits.  A prize can be given to the team that has the most correct answers. 

 

(Contributed by Rodd Moses, West Hills High School, Santee, CA)

  

Stand up for Your Personality Type at Work 

 

This exercise helps students to understand how personalities affect the work environment and promotes understanding and appreciation of different personality types in the work environment.  It appeals to students who have a kinesthetic/tactile learning style.  After students have completed their personality assessment and have their results in hand, ask all students to stand up.  Explain the difference between an introvert and an extravert and ask students to look at their assessment results.  Have introverted types stand on one side of the room and have extraverts stand on the other side of the room.  Combination types can stand in the middle.  Have each group review the checklists pertaining to the ideal work environment.  These checklists are located at the beginning of the chapter, Exploring Your Personality and Major or as a handout.  Note that each checklist has a section of general qualities of each type and is followed by qualities that describe the ideal work environment.   Have each group select a reporter.  Ask the groups to discuss these questions:

           

 

Extravert Group:

            What are the advantages of working with an extravert?

            Introvert Group:

            What are the advantages of working with an introvert?

            Combination Group: 

            What are the advantages of working with a combination type? 

 

The reporter for each group reports on the group discussion.  If the classroom is small, move the class outdoors for this exercise. 

 

Repeat this process with sensing and intuitive types, thinking and feeling types and judging and perceptive types.  The judging and perceptive groups are most likely to have conflicts.  Keep the discussion positive by reminding students that there are no good or bad types, but every type has strengths and weaknesses.  Focus on the strengths.   Discuss how these personality types can work together to get the job done.

 

Ideal Career

 

This exercise helps students to think about how their personality preferences affect their vision of the ideal career.  Click here to view the handout, Ideal Career

 

Interview Someone over 40

 

Ask students to interview three people over 40 and ask these questions:

§ If you were 18 years old again, what would you do differently?

§ What was the best decision that you made between the ages of 18 and 22?

§ What advice would you give to a person who is 18 years old?

Have students report their results to the class. Much of the information from this type of interview relates to continuing education, career planning and establishing good relationships. See the Interview worksheet for this exercise.

 

Personality Assignment 
 

Have students summarize what they have learned by filling out a form that summarizes their results, writing a guided paper, creating a PowerPoint presentation, or using new media to describe their personal strengths. If your students have difficulty with writing, use this form to help students summarize their results or to write a guided paper, My Personality. Click this link to view an example of using Powtoon to create a video summarizing personality strenghts. Here are the major topics to include in this assignment.

 

 Using your personality profile, describe your personality type.  Focus on your gifts and talents and what you believe to be true about yourself.

 

 Describe the first letter of your personality type (E or I.)  First define the term and then tell how you match the description.  If you are a combination type, describe your type.

 

 Describe the second letter of your personality type (S or N) as above. 

 

 Describe the third letter of your personality type (T or J) as above. 

 

 Describe the fourth letter of your personality type (J or P) as above.  Remember that J means orderly and organized.  P means spontaneous and flexible.

 

How do you learn best?

 

What careers are suggested by your personality assessment and are you interested in them?

 

 What did you think of the personality assessment?  Did you agree or disagree?  Was it valuable?  Did you get some ideas for a major or career?

 

 Write a Letter Home

 

An alternative writing assignment on personality type is to assign students to write a letter home.  Include these topics:

 

  • Things I am learning about myself
  • My biggest surprise
  • My greatest challenge
  • My greatest success 

 

For Online Classes:

 

Online Discussion

 

Option 1: Write a one paragraph description of one aspect of your own personality type (E, I, S, N, T, F, J, P.) In your paragraph define the term and state how it affects your personal life and future career. Read the other student posts and find one with the same personality preference. Reply to that student's post comparing your similarities and differences.

 

Begin the discussion by providing a model post describing one aspect of your personality type. Remember to focus your descriptions on the positive aspects of this type. Then write a sample response.

 

Option 2: Please read the chapter on personality before commenting on these scenarios.  Keep in mind the theory that we are all born with certain personality types and there are no good or bad types.  Each type has gifts and talents that can be used to be a successful and happy person.  Relate your comments to the concepts in this chapter.  Make comments on at least 2 of these scenarios.  It is helpful to begin your thinking with identifying the personality types of the people involved.   

 

Scenario 1 (Sensing vs. Intuitive):  Julie is a pre-school teacher.  She assigns her class to draw a picture of a bicycle.  Students share their pictures with the class.  One of the students has drawn a bicycle with wings.  Another student laughs at the drawing and says, "Bicycles don't have wings!"  How should the teacher handle this situation?

 

Scenario 2 (Thinking vs. Feeling):  John has the almost perfect girlfriend.  She is beautiful, intelligent and fun to be with.  She only has one flaw.  John thinks that she is too emotional and wishes she could be a little more rational.  When his girlfriend tries to talk to him about emotional issues, he analyzes her problems and proposes a logical solution.  His girlfriend doesn't like the solutions that John proposes.  Should John find a new girlfriend?

 

Scenario 3 (Introvert vs. Extravert):  Mary is the mother of 2 children ages 5 (daughter) and 8 (son).  The five-year old is very social and especially enjoys birthday parties.  At the last party she invited 24 girls and they all showed up at the party.  Everyone had a great time.  The 8 year old is very quiet and spends his time reading, doing art work, building models and hanging out with his one best friend.  Mary is concerned that her son does not have very many friends.  She decides to have a birthday party for her son also.  The only problem is that he cannot come up with a list of children to invite to the party.  What should Mary do?

 

Scenario 4 (Judging vs. Perceptive):  Jerry and Jennifer have just been married and they love each other very much.  Jennifer likes to keep the house neat and orderly and likes to plan out activities so that there are no surprises.  Jerry likes creative disorder.  He leaves his things all over the house.  He often comes up with creative ideas for having fun.  How can Jerry and Jennifer keep their good relationship going?

  

 

References for Faculty:

 

Do What You Are Psychometric Report

 

Kirby, Linda and Myers, Katharine.  Introduction to Type. CPP, Inc. 1998. www.cpp.com

 

Hammer, Allen L. and Macdaid, Gerald P. MBTI Career Report Manual.  Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologist Press, Inc., 1992.

ISBN not available.

This is a technical manual that summarizes research on careers.  It has an index of the most commonly chosen careers for each type.

 

Kroeger, Otto and Thuesen, Janet.  Type Talk: The 16 Personality Types that Determine how we Live, Love and Work.  New York: Dell Publishing, 1988.

 ISBN 0-385-29828-5

This book is a good reference for faculty for understanding the theory of type.

 

Quenk, Naomi L. and Hammer, Allen L.    MBTI Manual.  Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologist Press, 1998.

ISBN 0-89106-130-4

This is a technical reference that summarizes research and development of the MBTI.

 

Tieger, Paul D and Barron-Tieger, Barbara.  Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You through the Secrets of Personality Type.  Boston, New York and London: Little, Brown and Company, 1995.

ISBN 0-316-84522-1

Recommend this book for your students to read if they are interested in learning more about their personality type.  It is excellent and easy to read.  It has a wonderful section on careers with examples of real people in each personality type.